Prakash Mallya, Country Manager for Intel Malaysia and Singapore giving an overview of what Intel showcased at Computex this year

Prakash Mallya, Country Manager for Intel Malaysia and Singapore giving an overview of what Intel showcased at Computex this year

At the recent COMPUTEX Taipei, Intel unveiled a series of new devices running its Haswell as well as Haswell-refresh processors. The microprocessor company’s push for 2-in-1 devices and various other computing form factors started several years ago, and have finally begun to bear fruit now.

According to Leighton Philips, Director of Product Marketing and Pricing for Intel Asia Pacific and Japan, the traditional desktop computer has seen a decline in demand, with end users, be they for the home or business beginning to opt for different desktop form factors, such as mini PCs, all-in-one computers and desktop replacement notebooks.

Leighton Philips kicked things off with the announcement of Intel's Devil's Canyon and Pentium Anniversary Edition processors

Leighton Philips, Director of Product Marketing and Pricing for Intel Asia Pacific and Japan kicked things off with the announcement of Intel’s Devil’s Canyon and Pentium Anniversary Edition processors

That being said, one of the biggest growing segments for Intel’s desktop processors is in the enthusiast and gaming industry. With 700 million PC gamers worldwide, the company projects that in 2015, the PC gaming industry will see a profit of US$25 billion, making it one of the most profitable entertainment industries in the world.

It is with this in mind that Intel looks to refresh their high-end processor line-up with the Intel Core i7-4790K processor, codename Devil’s Canyon. It features a 4.0GHz base frequency, fully unlocked, meaning you can overclock the processor to breakneck speeds, while supporting the LGA 1150 socket at the same time, so that users can still use the Z87 motherboards that they may have already owned.

Intel's new Devil's Canyon processor is clocked at 4.0GHz, features reworked thermal interface module that allows the processor run at lower temperatures

Intel’s new Devil’s Canyon processor is clocked at 4.0GHz, features reworked thermal interface module that allows the processor run at lower temperatures

For those who are looking for a more affordable overclocking solution need not fret either as Intel has also unveiled a new unlocked dual core processor in the form of the Intel Pentium Anniversary Edition, clocked at 3.2GHz base frequency, which also supports the LGA 1150 socket motherboards.

The advent of Intel’s 4th generation Core series processors meant that OEMs can design convertible notebooks that are not only thin, but perform extremely well too. That being said, one of the biggest issues bothering manufacturers is the fact that the processors, even the notebook models still require a fan to cool it down.

Leighton showing off Intel's Llama Mountain, a 12.5 inch reference notebook running Intel's new Core M processor for convertible and detachable notebooks

Leighton showing off Intel’s Llama Mountain, a 12.5 inch reference notebook running Intel’s new Core M processor for convertible and detachable notebooks

At COMPUTEX, Intel also unveiled the new Intel Core m and Core m vPro processors, designed specifically for fanless 2-in-1 detachables and convertibles. This new processor will allow notebook makers to explore even thinner form factors, and as an example, we were briefly shown a concept of what these Core m powered notebooks can look like in the form of the Llama Mountain 2-in-1 reference design notebooks.

Featuring a 12.5-inch QHD resolution display, this notebook is 7.2mm thin, and this is achieved thanks to the processor’s capability to run without the need of a fan. The battery life on the Llama Mountain is rated to be around the nine hours mark, which makes it an excellent device to bring around for work.

Another one of Intel's concept Mini PCs, which is no longer than the length of a pen

One of Intel’s concept Mini PCs, which is no longer than the length of a pen

WiDi, or Wireless Display has been around for a number of years now. While it has not seen a strong adoption rate, Intel hopes that the upgraded version of this technology, called WiGig, which is not only capable of connecting to two display devices, but can also deliver wireless LAN capabilities, all thanks to a connectivity rate that is over 10 times faster than IEEE’s 802.11n wireless standards, according to the Wireless Gigabit Alliance (WiGig).

This technology is likely to be available for mass production in the first half of 2015, with notebooks, convertibles and detachables looking to be the main beneficiary. Interesting things are abound thanks to Intel’s constant push in technology, and we look forward to seeing what the future holds for computing.

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