• SPECIFICATIONS
  • USB 2.0 interface
  • 400-3,200 DPI, switchable
  • 3,600fps
  • 125Hz, 500Hz, 1000Hz response time
  • 6 programmable buttons, 64kB on-board memory
  • Pros:
  • Affordable
  • Good number of features
  • Cons:
  • Tracking and precision takes getting used to
  • Lacks on-the-fly profile switching

For The Initiates

Armaggeddon’s list of gaming accessories is certainly growing, and you bet that they’re not done just yet. We’ve received the innocuously-named Armaggeddon Mikoyan FoxBat, a budget gaming mouse, aimed at those who are just starting out on their gaming journey.

Despite being labeled a budget gaming mouse, the FoxBat comes equipped with most of the more welcoming, inherently necessary features, such as six programmable buttons and a button to easily switch between CPI levels.

Setting up the mouse is as easy as just plugging in the FoxBat and running the software installer that comes with it. Through the HomeBase software, users can set a variety of things, including macros, profiles, and CPI levels. Speaking of CPI levels, the default settings for each four profiles include 400, 800, 1,600 and 3,200 CPI. Each level is indicated by a different LED light, which is also programmable, so you’ll know which light represents which CPI count.

As with most Armaggeddon mice, the FoxBat also comes with weight management, giving users an option of having either a light or heavy mouse, depending on their needs and style of play. You access the weight compartment through a removable hatch at the bottom, which provides you with several slots to fit in the provided weight pellets.

The FoxBat performs pretty well in some of the games that we’ve tried it on. It works well on action and adventure games such as Diablo or Dungeon Defenders, but when it comes to precision games such as Counter-Strike, we found it a bit difficult to adapt to its tracking and precision. While the robust customisation options does let us eventually obtain a more proper ‘feel’, the tracking itself doesn’t flow as smoothly and it does lack some accuracy.

The FoxBat features on-board memory, which stores the settings of your mouse on the device itself, but in order to change the settings or profile of the mouse, the software still needs to be installed in the other computer. A bit counterproductive, considering that other mice have on-the-fly profile changing without needing to install a software, but for the price the FoxBat is being sold at, it’s not really that big a problem after all.

CHIP CONCLUDE: The Mikoyan FoxBat won’t top the best Armaggeddon has, but what it offers for fledgling gamers is a look into the highly competitive world of gaming, a step from which they can start to grow their own persona, and learn for themselves what is needed to be a professional gamer.

(previously published in issue August 2012)